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Website developed, funded and provided by MSD. It is intended to provide general educational information and does not take the place of professional medical advice.

“The HPV vaccine” refers to the HPV vaccine currently included on the NHS childhood vaccination schedule.


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HOW TO JOIN THE FIGHT
AGAINST CERTAIN
HPV CANCERS

You can join the fight against certain HPV
infections and cancers by consenting for your
child (boy or girl) to have the HPV vaccine as
part of the NHS childhood vaccination schedule.

How?

Boys and girls aged 12-13 years can be vaccinated against certain types of HPV on the NHS childhood vaccination schedule.

Look out for a consent form from your child’s school.

This needs to be signed and returned for your child to be vaccinated.

You can speak to your child’s doctor, practice nurse or school nurse about HPV vaccination.

DOWNLOAD A HANDY HPV LEAFLET

When?

Boys aged 12-13 years

Can be vaccinated at school in year 8 from September 2019.

Girls aged 12-13 years

Can be vaccinated at school in year 8.

 

The HPV vaccine is given at 12-13 years because:

  • It helps protect your child before they are likely to come into contact with certain HPV types that can cause certain HPV cancers
  • Having the vaccine at the recommended age means their body can learn how to fight certain types of HPV viruses before they may catch them

The HPV vaccine is given in 2 doses.

This is to make sure your child gets the right protection against the HPV types the vaccine helps prevent. The second dose will be given at least 6 months after the first dose.

This is to make sure your child gets the right protection against the HPV types the vaccine helps prevent.

The second dose will be given at least 6 months after the first dose.

 

Look out for vaccination dates and information from your child’s school.

You can also speak to your child’s doctor if their school is not offering HPV vaccination.

 

Girls aged 12 to 25:

If your daughter misses a HPV vaccine dose, she can be vaccinated as part of a catch-up programme at school. Once she’s left school, she can be vaccinated on the NHS childhood vaccination schedule up to the age of 25. Speak to her school or doctor for more information about HPV vaccination.

WHAT?

Boys and girls will receive the same HPV vaccine.

It will help protect girls and boys from certain types of HPV, including the 2 types HPV 16 and HPV 18 that have the highest risk of causing certain HPV cancers, like anal or cervical cancer.

 

HPV 16 and 18 infections have GONE DOWN by 86% in women aged 16-21

(since HPV vaccinations began in England)

The HPV vaccine has been well tested.

It is scientifically tested for its safety and to make sure it helps protect against certain HPV infections.

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) made a statement in March 2017 that, based on their new review, there is no evidence that links HPV vaccination to certain chronic (long-lasting) conditions.

OVER 10 MILLION DOSES OF HPV VACCINES HAVE BEEN GIVEN IN THE UK IN OVER 10 YEARS

HAVE MORE QUESTIONS ABOUT HPV AND THE HPV VACCINE?