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WHY JOIN THE FIGHT
AGAINST CERTAIN
HPV CANCERS?

Most HPV infections go away on their own, but certain types of HPV viruses may cause diseases, like anal or cervical cancer.

Girls and boys can join the fight against certain HPV cancers by getting vaccinated and helping prevent the spread of certain HPV viruses.

 

Missed a HPV vaccine dose or need information about HPV vaccination programme timings due to COVID-19?

Learn More >

Girls and boys can join the fight against certain HPV cancers by getting vaccinated and helping prevent the spread of certain HPV viruses.

HPV means human papillomavirus.

It’s the name for a group of viruses that may cause diseases, like certain cancers.

HPV is common and spreads easily.

The viruses move from person to person through close skin-to-skin contact.

 

AN ESTIMATED

4 OUT OF 5 OF US

MAY BE INFECTED WITH AT LEAST ONE TYPE OF HPV AT SOME POINT IN OUR LIVES.

Most HPV infections don’t cause any problems. Many people don’t know they’re infected because the infection clears up on its own.

Certain types of HPV viruses are called high-risk types because they may cause certain cancers if an infection lasts a long time. For example, HPV 16 and 18 are high-risk types and are commonly linked to certain HPV cancers, like anal cancer and cervical cancer.

of anal cancers worldwide are caused by HPV types 16 and 18

of cervical cancers worldwide are caused by HPV types 16 and 18

Only some HPV infections with high-risk HPV types may cause certain cancers, and it doesn’t happen to everyone.

download hpv by numbers

20+ YEARS

An infection caused by a high-risk HPV type can take about 20 years or more to turn into cancer

2 YEARS

Most HPV infections don’t cause trouble and clear up within 2 years

Your child can join the fight against certain HPV cancers by getting HPV vaccinated as part of the NHS childhood vaccination schedule.

It helps stop the spread of certain HPV viruses.

how to join the fight >

If you choose to vaccinate your child they can help protect other people who have not been vaccinated against certain HPV infections.

This is called herd immunity.

find out more here >