JOIN THE FIGHT

AGAINST CERTAIN

HPV CANCERS

HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination is available on the NHS in schools for all children in year 8/S1 as part of the National Immunisation Programme (NIP)

Website developed, funded and provided by MSD. It is intended to provide general educational information and does not take the place of professional medical advice.

Cartoon syringes
Boy and Girl supporting HPV Wise vaccination
Icons for circle with stars, calendar and syringe
Icons for circle with stars, calendar and syringe

HPV cancers develop when the immune system can’t clear up infections caused by types of high-risk human papillomaviruses.

Those HPV infections may cause changes in cells that increase the risk of certain cancers and pre-cancerous lesions in the future, like cervical cancer and anal cancer.

Vaccination can help reduce the risk of your son or daughter developing certain HPV cancers in the future by protecting them against types of high-risk human papillomaviruses.

Boy in white shirt facing left and looking up
Four out of five people may be infected with HPV
A image of boy and girl supporting HPV vaccination

WHY JOIN THE FIGHT AGAINST CERTAIN HPV CANCERS?

Although most HPV (human papillomavirus) infections go away on their own, some types of HPV may cause infections that increase the risk of certain cancers and pre-cancerous cell changes.

The HPV vaccination programme is available on the NHS in schools so that boys and girls can join the fight against types of HPV cancers, like anal cancer and cervical cancer.

HPV means human papillomavirus

It’s the name for a group of viruses that may cause diseases in adulthood, like certain cancers and pre-cancerous cell changes.

HPV is common and spreads easily

The viruses move from person to person through close skin-to-skin contact.

Many people don’t know they’re infected with HPV because infections don’t usually cause any symptoms and clear up on their own.

Some types of HPV are called high-risk because they increase the risk of cancers if an infection lasts a long time. HPV 16 and HPV 18 are examples high-risk viruses and cause most cases of anal cancer and cervical cancer.

Group of boys in school uniform
Picture of anal cancer in the intestine

75-80%

of ANAL CANCERS worldwide are caused by HPV types 16 and 18

Picture of cervical cancer in the uterus

OVER 70%

of CERVICAL CANCERS worldwide are caused by HPV types 16 and 18

Picture of HPV infection with magnifying glass

2 YEARS

Most HPV infections don’t cause symptoms and clear up within two years

Picture of the HPV virus with gender symbols

+20 YEARS

An infection caused by a high-risk human papillomavirus can take about 20 years or more to turn into types of HPV cancer

Your child can join the fight against certain HPV cancers by getting HPV vaccinated as part of the National Immunisation Programme (NIP).

HPV vaccination helps stop the spread of types of human papillomavirus, including high-risk types HPV 16 and HPV 18.

Boy supporting HPVWise vaccination
A image of boy and girl supporting HPV vaccination

HOW TO JOIN THE FIGHT AGAINST CERTAIN HPV CANCERS

Boys and girls aged 12 to 13 years (11 to 13 years in Scotland) are offered the HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination during school year 8/S1.

  • Look out for an HPV vaccination programme consent form from your child’s school.

  • The form should be completed, signed and returned to the school.

  • The consent form covers the full course of HPV vaccination.

You can also speak to your child’s doctor, school nurse or practice nurse about the HPV vaccination programme.

It is important that your child receives all doses at the recommended age.

This will help make sure they get the cover they need to help reduce the risk of certain HPV cancers in the future.

You can also speak to your child’s doctor if their school is not offering the HPV vaccination programme.

The HPV vaccination programme helps protect both girls and boys from types of HPV infections that can increase their risk of certain HPV cancers in the future.

HPV vaccination helps prevent infections caused by the two high-risk human papillomavirus types that cause most cases of anal cancer and cervical cancer around the world.

Additional information on the NHS national immunisation programme may be found on the relevant UK Health Security Agency website.

Photograph of group of four children greeting each other
A Girl supporting HPV Vaccination
The NHS HPV Vaccination Programme

Protect your child now to help reduce their risk of certain HPV cancers in the future. Watch the video below to learn more:

Girl encouraging HPV Vaccination

HPV vaccination also helps reduce the spread of types of human papillomavirus from one person to another during close skin-to-skin contact.

The long-term safety profile of HPV vaccines has been well studied in millions of people worldwide.

HPV vaccines are closely monitored to ensure they continue to be suitable for use.

Over 10.5 million doses of HPV vaccines have been given in the UK in over 10 years
Photograph of girl flexing her arm

“The HPV vaccine” refers to the HPV vaccine currently included on the National Immunisation Programme (NIP).

July 2022

GB-HPV-00198

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